Eponym Ethics: Naming Inhumane Medicine, by Philip Brady

As one of the most studied, popularly represented, and morally contemptuous regimes in modern times, to publicly adopt any aspect of Nazi or fascist language in contemporary society would quickly draw widespread revulsion and reprehension. Yet, the legacies of Nazi experimentation and medicinal breakthroughs found in the nomenclature of science and medicine still produce uncomfortable Continue Reading

From Colonial Subject to Criminals: Exploring why forensic fingerprinting developed in Colonial India, and its subsequent transfer to Victorian Britain, By Hannah Teeger

Modern detective novels and television dramas have captured public imagination for over a century. Forensic fingerprinting features in nearly every single one. Whilst the practise is one many are familiar with, few know of its modern history of development in colonial India, and the story of how it reached Victorian Britain to further develop into the technique widely used today across the globe.

Fighting Lesbian Erasure in Historiography: Restoring Sappho as a Queer Identity, by Amber Barry

In perhaps Sappho’s most quoted fragment, a preoccupation with her reputation to prosperity is immediately and ironically apparent. Most likely addressing a lover, Sappho writes: ‘someone will remember us / I say / even in another time,’ (trans. Carson). Yet the ways in which Sappho’s work has been interpreted and conceptualised throughout time has been anything but straightforward, simultaneously frustrated by her work’s fragmentation and by the complexities of identity politics.